Reasons To Use Cartoon Animation in Online Marketing

intro

Cartoon animations can be a powerful marketing tool for online marketers. Whether marketers choose an animated character that chimes in to sell office products on television or a ‘Tony the Tiger’ type that actually becomes integral to the brand, animations provide powerful imagery and associations. Animations have broad appeal and, when used cleverly, can help build brand awareness, improve brand perception, and boost conversions and sales. … marketers are flocking to animations because they are quick to deliver messages, lighten up tough subjects, shareable, disarm the cynics, and are cost-effective.

Reasons To Use Cartoon Animation in Online Marketing

Quickly deliver messages

Animations, like many other multimedia tools, replace the boring, heavy text with powerful images and emotional audio. It’s obvious – even reading this short summary – that audiences are more inclined to engage with multimedia than to read. However, unlike other multimedia, animations are unique in their ability to quickly distill and impart the essence of a message. They enable us to deliver core marketing messages using efficient multimedia, but without the fear of being considered overly blunt – thanks to the friendly, animated mouthpiece. Animations are hyper-succinct. They can distill even the most complicated idea to its essence. Clever animation artists can communicate the core principles within seconds. To put it simply, animation can make the complex simple.

Light

Most of us have grown up watching cartoons. Our early and formative days are filled with animations and cartoons that arouse positive, carefree associations from our childhood. In fact, the commercial success of animations continues to compound these light and playful images and associations. When marketers use animation today, they can sidestep the heaviness of life, the cumbersome aspects of many decisions, and simply tap into their audiences’ more basic, innocent understanding. Just ask Tony the Tiger, who summed up all the complications of choosing a breakfast cereal for the kids: “They’re Grrreat!”

Easy to consume and shareable

Like other types of video, animations make the content interesting. It perks up our senses and keep us more engaged in what we are doing. (It’s easier to listen to ads than reading ads, isn’t it?) In the field of multimedia advertising, animations are a powerful medium. Animations enable marketers to achieve the same engagement as other video formats, but with a uniquely straightforward marketing voice. Caped in the clothes of cutesy, engaging animated characters, animations can say and do things that spokespeople cannot. While few people would sit and watch advertisements (except during the Superbowl), many people will watch (not just sit through) promotional messages that are delivered by cartoons.

Moreover, like a fun ad or a goofy YouTube clip, animated marketing messages can be fun enough to share. While we don’t often share white papers or datasheets with friends, exciting, engaging animated movies are indeed “shareable.” Surveys show that up to 65 percent of online audiences share animated videos with their friends after watching them. So if you can be both entertaining and informative, then you may hit on something that has ever-increasing ROI.

Disarming – put your viewers at ease

Ohhh, the childhood associations… the happiness, humor, energy, and fun of losing yourself in a cartoon! Now, as adults, we can rediscover those feelings. How much more accessible is it to watch an animation than swallow documents crammed with statistics, charts, technical considerations? While animations won’t necessarily replace the critical thinking of a decision-maker, they have the impact of lowering their guard, of serving as icebreakers that can warm up audiences with humor.

Cost-effective

Simple animations are one of the most cost-effective forms of communication for a marketer. And the costs associated with creating animations are dropping, so getting started is relatively barrier-free. Just consider the costs of traditional videos, such as set design, location shoots, production costs, and paying models or spokespersons.

CARTOON ALSO SHOWS THE FOLLOWING
1. Symbolism
Cartoonists use simple objects, or symbols, to stand for larger concepts or ideas.
After you identify the symbols in a cartoon, think about what the cartoonist intends each symbol to stand for.
2. Exaggeration
Sometimes cartoonists overdo or exaggerate, the physical characteristics of people or things in order to make a point.
When you study a cartoon, look for any characteristics that seem overdone or overblown. (Facial characteristics and clothing are some of the most commonly exaggerated characteristics.) Then, try to decide what point the cartoonist was trying to make through exaggeration.
3. Labeling
Cartoonists often label objects or people to make it clear exactly what they stand for.
Watch out for the different labels that appear in a cartoon, and ask yourself why the cartoonist chose to label that particular person or object. Does the label make the meaning of the object more clear?
4. Analogy
An analogy is a comparison between two, unlike things that share some characteristics. By comparing a complex issue or situation with a more familiar one, cartoonists can help their readers see it in a different light.
After you’ve studied a cartoon for a while, try to decide what the cartoon’s main analogy is. What two situations does the cartoon compare? Once you understand the main analogy, decide if this comparison makes the cartoonist’s point more clear to you.
5. Irony
The irony is the difference between the ways things are and the way things should be or the way things are expected to be. Cartoonists often use irony to express their opinion on an issue.
When you look at a cartoon, see if you can find any irony in the situation the cartoon depicts. If you can, think about what point the irony might be intended to emphasize. Does the irony help the cartoonist express his or her opinion more effectively?
Once you’ve identified the persuasive techniques that the cartoonist used, ask yourself:
What issue is this political cartoon about?
What is the cartoonist’s opinion on this issue?
What other opinions can you imagine another person having on this issue?
Did you find this cartoon persuasive? Why or why not?
What other techniques could the cartoonist have used to make this cartoon more persuasive?

Conclusion
These cost considerations, combined with animation’s flexibility, make this an appealing tool for marketers. Beyond pure economics, animations are flexible enough to be used in a variety of situations. Whether to deliver a marketing message or for use in a training video or walkthrough, animations tell the story quickly in a very clear and simple manner. From home page welcomes navigation directions to onsite support, custom animations can help web visitors understand, engage, and most important, act.


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